Solving Bratman’s video game puzzle in two formalisms

Robert Trypuz, Emiliano Lorini, Laure Vieu (2007): Solving Bratman's video game puzzle in two formalisms. In: Arrazola,; Larrazabal, (Ed.): ILCLI International Workshop on Logic and Philosophy of Knowledge, Communication and Action (LogKCA-07), pp. 411–426, 2007.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to propose two formal solutions to a well- known problem in the recent philosophical literature called the Video Game puzzle. The Video Game puzzle was introduced by Michael Bratman in the 80’s and then became a challenge for any theory of intention and action. A few approaches to this puzzle have been dis- cussed in philosophy, but to the best of our knowledge, no solution has been spelled out in a logical formalism.
The first solution proposed in this paper is based on a rich first- order theory of time, actions and intentions in which individual actions are reified. The second one is based on a multi-modal logic of intention and action in which the concept of attempt is formalized by means of a modal operator for attempt.

BibTeX (Download)

@inproceedings{logkca2007vg,
title = {Solving Bratman\'s video game puzzle in two formalisms},
author = {Robert Trypuz and Emiliano Lorini and Laure Vieu},
editor = {X. Arrazola and J. M. Larrazabal},
url = {http://www.irit.fr/publis/LILAC/TLV-VG-LOGKCA07.pdf},
year  = {2007},
date = {2007-01-01},
booktitle = {ILCLI International Workshop on Logic and Philosophy of Knowledge, Communication and Action (LogKCA-07)},
pages = {411--426},
abstract = {The aim of this paper is to propose two formal solutions to a well- known problem in the recent philosophical literature called the Video Game puzzle. The Video Game puzzle was introduced by Michael Bratman in the 80’s and then became a challenge for any theory of intention and action. A few approaches to this puzzle have been dis- cussed in philosophy, but to the best of our knowledge, no solution has been spelled out in a logical formalism.
The first solution proposed in this paper is based on a rich first- order theory of time, actions and intentions in which individual actions are reified. The second one is based on a multi-modal logic of intention and action in which the concept of attempt is formalized by means of a modal operator for attempt.},
keywords = {applied ontology, knowledge representation, OntoSTIT+},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {inproceedings}
}